Sunday, 13 April 2014

Up and Away... storytelling cabaret this wednesday

Looking for a fun low cost way to relax this week. Check out the latest Moth and Butterfly show…
 
 

Moth & Butterfly

A Monthly Night of Storytelling and Improvisation

Third Wednesdays of the Month


Wednesday 16th of April 2014

Upstairs @ Ard Bia, Spanish Arch, Galway

 

The Theme for April is:

'Up and Away'

Doors at 8PM - Admission €5 - tickets on the door

 

Moth & Butterfly continue into 2014 with their exciting series of nights, which brings together the art forms of both Storytelling & Improvisation. The night is Galway based but also travels to festivals and events around Ireland.

Each M&B night will have a special theme, and all Storytellers will be invited to tell a story that fits with that theme.  For April  2014 the theme is 'Up and Away'.

Stories will be provided by the Moth and Butterfly Crew Creative team, and of course, by the Audience themselves! 


There will be three types of Storytelling on the night:

Moth style stories must be short, true, thematic, and feature the teller themselves as a character.

Improvised stories will be created fresh on the spot – no two are the same!

Freefall stories are all other stories that still fit the theme – from fiction to fairy tales, from tall tales to a story in a song.

This is a night for oral storytelling, so no reading or notes allowed – just pure story!

The night is for both tellers and listeners, for without good listeners; there would be no good stories! There will be opportunity for people to tell and also to just sit comfy and join in the journey of the imagination.

Great stories invite us in for a listen. They don’t always have to be funny by any means. They draw from a wide emotional palette.  We love to laugh, but also to cry, to growl, to gasp.  We invite people to tell stories from the heart. 


For more detailed information on how the night will work, please check out our page on Facebook.

The Moth & Butterfly Crew is made up of professional performers, writers and storytellers.  They were inspired by the transformational nature of improvisation (Butterfly) along with the wonderful ‘Moth’ tradition of true Storytelling that originated in the USA, and thought that the two combined would make for a very special night.   They are delighted to share this with Galway Audiences.

Our events attract audience members from all over the globe and welcome your feedback.

"A really lovely night - thank you for creating something very special, we're already looking forward to the next one..." - Michael, Moth and Butterfly audience member.

Managing Exam Stress


As well as the Exam De-Stress Programme there are plenty of other techniques that students can use to lower exam stress and boost their results. Cindy Dring, the Health Promotions Officer at Student Services, has written a series of short articles giving tips on Managing Exam Stress. They can be read at the links below










 

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Thursday, 10 April 2014

MANAGING EXAM STRESS: 8. A FINAL WORD

Plan how to get to the exam, remember that several hundred students will be traveling on the same route, get an early bus or see if you can walk to the exam hall. Don’t rely on vague offers of lifts; make the best arrangements that will work for you. If you sleep it out or have an accident on the way to the exam come in anyway and report to the exam hall. The invigilator will advise you on the best course of action. On the exam day the student union and the student advisers will be present to offer support outside the exam. Once the exam has started, if you are not able to control your anxiety after ten minutes, call the invigilator to your desk.

If your stress has recently increased significantly because of circumstances outside your control (e.g. family problems, accommodation problems, death in the family), see a student advisor, counselor or your academic year co-coordinator to discuss the impact on your exams.

 

This article was written by Cindy Dring ofStudent's Services Health Promotion. If you have problems or worries you feel you would like to talk about confidentially, contact Cindy at 091-492048. Alternatively e-mail her at cindy.dring@nuigalway.ie or just drop in to Aras Ni Eimhigh.

MANAGING EXAM STRESS 7. Anxiety Management Techniques


a) Thought-stopping technique
When we become anxious we begin to have negative thoughts (‘I can’t answer anything’ ‘I’m going to panic’ etc) If this is happening, halt the spiraling thoughts be mentally shouting ‘STOP! Or picture a road ‘STOP’ sign or traffic lights on red. Once you have literally stopped the thoughts, you can continue planning, or practice a relaxation technique

.
b) Creating a mild pain.
Pain effectively overrides all other thoughts and impulses. Even very mild pain – such as lightly pressing you fingernails in your palm – can block feelings of anxiety. Some people find it helpful to place an elastic band around one wrist, and lightly twang it when they are becoming anxious.


c) Use a mantra.
Derived from meditation, a mantra is a word or phrase, which you repeat to yourself. Saying something like ‘calm’ or ‘relax’ under your breath or in your head, over and over again, can help defuse anxiety.


d) Bridging objects. It can help to carry or wear something with positive associations with another person or place. Touching this ‘bridging object’ can be confirmation in its own right; then allow yourself a few minutes to think about the person or situation, which makes you feel good. This can have a really calming effect.


e) Self-talk
In exam anxiety or panic we often give ourselves negative messages, ‘I can’t do this’ ‘I’m going to fail’ ‘I’m useless’. Try to consciously replace these with positive, encouraging thoughts: ‘this is just anxiety, it can’t harm me’ Relax, concentrate, it’s going to be OK’ ‘I’m getting there, nearly over’

 

This article was written by Cindy Dring ofStudent's Services Health Promotion. If you have problems or worries you feel you would like to talk about confidentially, contact Cindy at 091-492048. Alternatively e-mail her at cindy.dring@nuigalway.ie or just drop in to Aras Ni Eimhigh.

MANAGING EXAM STRESS: 6 In the exam

IN THE EXAM

 

Here are some tried and tested remedies to the ‘I can’t answer anything’ feeling and other worrying thoughts about exams. When you get into the exam room and sit down, the following approach can help settle your nerves:

Focusing

·         Take a deep breath in and a long breath out

·         Breathe in again and straighten your back – as if someone were pulling a lever between your shoulder blades. Look straight ahead at something inanimate (the wall, a picture, the clock) and focus your mind on the positive thought ‘I CAN DO this exam’ as you breathe out.

·         Take another deep breath in and a long breath out. Then breathe normally.

·         Read the paper, do so thoroughly. If you begin to feel panicky again, repeat the focusing exercise.

Panicking will stop you reading carefully so it is important to keep yourself focused and positive. Read the whole paper once, then read it again and mark the questions you think you can answer. Then read those questions carefully – make sure you understand what is required – and select the ones you are going to answer. Decide on the order in which you’ll answer the questions. It is usually best to begin with the one you feel most confident about. Think about how you will plan your time and stick to your plan. Plan out your answer for each question as you go. If you find that thoughts or ideas about other questions come into your head, jot them down on a separate piece of paper – don’t spend time thinking about them now. If your concentration wanders or you begin to feel panicky, you could try the focusing exercises again, or use one of the following techniques to help you overcome anxious thoughts. If you are worried that you haven’t got time to spare on this, remember that taking 5 to 10 minutes NOW may save you spending the rest of the exam in a state of panic.

 

This article was written by Cindy Dring ofStudent's Services Health Promotion. If you have problems or worries you feel you would like to talk about confidentially, contact Cindy at 091-492048. Alternatively e-mail her at cindy.dring@nuigalway.ie or just drop in to Aras Ni Eimhigh.

MANAGING EXAM STRESS: 5. Aromatherapy & Positive self-statements

TRY AROMATHERAPY

Aromatherapy involves using essential oils from plants, which can help you to relax more easily. Try a couple of drops of lavender oil on your pillow at night. Or put a few drops of lavender, rosemary or geranium oil into your bath.

 POSITIVE SELF-STATEMENTS

Put yourself into a positive form of mind by imagining how you would LIKE things to go. Imagine yourself turning up for the exam feeling confident and relaxed – try to picture it in as much detail as possible. Rather like rehearsing for a part in a play, this can replace negative, anxious thoughts with more positive ones.

The way we see ourselves and the way we think/talk to ourselves controls the way we will response in stressful situations. Each time you start thinking or saying something negative such as ‘I failed last time, I’ll probably fail again this time,’ challenge this attitude with a strong logical, forceful self-statement: ‘OK, so I failed last time but that doesn’t mean I am going to fail again this time. I’m better prepared and I’ve got a new approach to my work’ Change your paralyzing stress to motivating stress. Don’t work to the last minute on the night or morning before the exam. Last minute revisions may leave you feeling muddled and anxious. Pulling all-nighters works for the first few exams but by the third day you will be seriously under performing. Remember most exams start at 9.30am, so in the weeks before the exam you need to adjust to functioning academically between 9-5.00pm.

 

This article was written by Cindy Dring ofStudent's Services Health Promotion. If you have problems or worries you feel you would like to talk about confidentially, contact Cindy at 091-492048. Alternatively e-mail her at cindy.dring@nuigalway.ie or just drop in to Aras Ni Eimhigh.

MANAGING EXAM STRESS: 4. Coffee & Alcohol

AVOID STRESS ENHANCING DRUGS

Caffeine is a very powerful drug- its acts directly on the central nervous system and heightens emotional arousal. You will have enough emotional arousal just from worrying about exams; it seems an extremely bad idea to fill your system up with a drug that will activate that.

BEWARE OF ALCOHOL

Alcohol may help you to feel relaxed but at a serious cost. The reason why alcohol is so popular as a social drug is because it has an amnesiac effect – it helps you to forget. So people use it to relax because it helps them to forget what’s bothering them – at least for the time being. The problem is that alcohol is not selective in what it helps you to forget. During exam times forgetting is exactly what you don’t need to do!

This article was written by Cindy Dring ofStudent's Services Health Promotion. If you have problems or worries you feel you would like to talk about confidentially, contact Cindy at 091-492048. Alternatively e-mail her at cindy.dring@nuigalway.ie or just drop in to Aras Ni Eimhigh.